The terrifying power of mega tsunamis

1 UFOS

The #1 UFO Resource

1 UFOS - News - Books - Videos - Feeds

1 UFOS Search Engine is Powered by the 1 Search Project


Tsunamis are one of the most destructive and deadly natural disasters.

In recent history, the two most devastating events occurred in the Indian Ocean in 2004 and Japan in 2011 – killing nearly 300,000 people in total and causing more than $315 billion dollars in damages.

However, these ‘regular’ tsunamis cannot compare to another category of massive waves known as ‘mega tsunamis’.

The Earth has experienced a handful of these and the most famous may be the event that wiped out the dinosaurs – the asteroid generated a wave up to 3.1 miles high.

Scroll down for videos 

In recent history, the two most destructive events occurred in the Indian Ocean in 2004 (pictured) and Japan in 2011. However, these ¿regular¿ tsunamis cannot compare to another category of massive waves known as ¿mega tsunamis¿ In recent history, the two most destructive events occurred in the Indian Ocean in 2004 (pictured) and Japan in 2011. However, these ¿regular¿ tsunamis cannot compare to another category of massive waves known as ¿mega tsunamis¿

In recent history, the two most destructive events occurred in the Indian Ocean in 2004 (pictured) and Japan in 2011. However, these ‘regular’ tsunamis cannot compare to another category of massive waves known as ‘mega tsunamis’

MEGA TSUNAMIS  

Unlike a regular tsunami that is created by an earthquake, a mega tsunami is usually created when a massive amount of material suddenly falls into water which displaces that water into a huge wave.

 A landslide into a reservoir in Italy created a wave 820 feet (250 meters) high that traveled over a dam and into a village below, which left it in ruins.

A larger tsunami happened in happened in Lituya Bay, Alaska in 1958 when a landslide fell into the bay.

This event generated waves 1,722 feet (525 meters) high, which caused damage to the area surrounding the bay and destroyed millions of trees.

However, the largest mega tsunami to occur in history happened 66 million years ago. 

It’s believed that when the asteroid hit Earth that wiped out the dinosaurs, it generated an unbelievable wave up to 3.1 miles (5 kilometers) high.

The YouTube channel, ‘RealLifeLore’, posted a video last week entitled ‘How Big do Tsunamis Get?’

‘Tsunamis are some of the most powerful and deadliest forces of nature,’ ReaLifeLore said in a YouTube video.

‘Within recent memory you may recall both the 2004 Indian Ocean and 2011 Japan tsunami – both of which resulted in catastrophic damage and loss of life.’

The Indian Ocean tsunami is the deadliest in history, as it killed around 250,000 people when it struck.

The earthquake itself released more energy than every explosive that was detonated in World Word II – this is also including the nuclear bombs.

And it created a wave that was 100 feet (20 meters) high in some places.

Japan’s tsunami in 2011 claimed 2,500 lives when it struck, and it caused an estimated $300 billion worth of damages in the area.

The earthquake created waves as high as 133 feet (40.5 meters) high, which is just about 16 feet (5 meters) shorter than the Statue of liberty.

Although these events wreaked havoc and devastated these areas, they aren’t the largest ones to strike the Earth.

‘Unlike a regular tsunami that is created by an earthquake, a mega tsunami is usually created when a massive amount of material suddenly falls into water which displaces that water into a huge wave,’ RealLifeLore explains.

One of these terrifying events occurred in Italy back in 1963, just 62 miles (100 kilometers) north of Venice.

It happened following the government’s construction of the world’s largest dam.

ARE MEGA TSUNAMIS COMMON?

In the early 2000s, other researchers started publishing evidence that the Cape Verdes could generate large tsunamis. 

Others have argued that Spain’s Canary Islands have already done so. 

Simon Day, a senior researcher at University College London has sparked repeated controversy by warning that any future eruption of the Canary Islands’ active Cumbre Vieja volcano could set off a flank collapse that might form an initial wave 3,000 feet high. 

The tsunami in the Indian Ocean created waves 100 feet (20 meters) high in some places. However, the tsunami in Japan in 2011 (pictured) generated waves 133ft (40.5 meters) high, which is just about 16 feet (5 meters) shorter than the Statue of liberty The tsunami in the Indian Ocean created waves 100 feet (20 meters) high in some places. However, the tsunami in Japan in 2011 (pictured) generated waves 133ft (40.5 meters) high, which is just about 16 feet (5 meters) shorter than the Statue of liberty

The tsunami in the Indian Ocean created waves 100 feet (20 meters) high in some places. However, the tsunami in Japan in 2011 (pictured) generated waves 133ft (40.5 meters) high, which is just about 16 feet (5 meters) shorter than the Statue of liberty

This, he says, could erase more than nearby islands. 

Such a wave might still be 300 feet high when it reached west Africa an hour or so later he says, and would still be 150 feet high along the coasts of North and South America. 

So far, such studies have raised mainly tsunamis of publicity, and vigorous objections from other scientists that such events are improbable. 

A 2013 study of deep-sea sediments by the United Kingdom’s National Oceanography Centre suggests that the Canaries have probably mostly seen gradual collapses. 

Part of the controversy hangs not only on the physics of the collapses themselves, but on how efficiently resulting waves could travel. 

In 1792, part of Japan’s Mount Unzen collapsed, hitting a series of nearby bays with waves as high as 300 feet, and killing some 15,000 people.

On July 9, 1958, an earthquake shook 90 million tons of rock into Alaska’s isolated Lituya Bay; this created an astounding 1,724-foot-high wave, the largest ever recorded. 

Two fishermen who happened to be in their boat that day were carried clear over a nearby forest; miraculously, they survived. 

These events, however, occurred in confined spaces. In the open ocean, waves created by landslides are generally thought to lose energy quickly, and thus to pose mainly a regional hazard. 

However, this is based largely on modeling, not real-world experience, so no one really knows how fast a killer wave might decay into a harmless ripple.

‘The only problem is that they were building this dam with a huge water reservoir the size of a large lake right next to one of the most unstable mountains on the planet,’ says the narrator in the YouTube video.

‘For months leading up to the completion of the dam there were several minor landslides and other signs that there could be a catastrophe coming, but rather than head the numerous warning signs the Italian government actually decided to sue the few journalists reporting on the issue for ‘undermining the social order’.

A landslide in Italy generated a wave 820 feet (250 meters) high and traveled over what was called the world's largest dam and into the village below. Now where the dam was is just a mountain side and the reservoir is filled in with land A landslide in Italy generated a wave 820 feet (250 meters) high and traveled over what was called the world's largest dam and into the village below. Now where the dam was is just a mountain side and the reservoir is filled in with land

A landslide in Italy generated a wave 820 feet (250 meters) high and traveled over what was called the world’s largest dam and into the village below. Now where the dam was is just a mountain side and the reservoir is filled in with land

A photo taken of the town Longarone before (pictured) and after the mega tsunami struck shows just how devastating the event was, as the little village was completely destroyed A photo taken of the town Longarone before (pictured) and after the mega tsunami struck shows just how devastating the event was, as the little village was completely destroyed
It caused an impact create 200 feet (60m deep and 260 feet (80m) wide when it hit the ground It caused an impact create 200 feet (60m deep and 260 feet (80m) wide when it hit the ground

 A photo taken of the town Longarone before (left) and after (right) the mega tsunami struck shows just how devastating the event was, as the little village was completely destroyed. It caused an impact create 200 feet (60m deep and 260 feet (80m) wide when it hit the ground

The landslide ended up being 10 times more than what engineers predicted and filled the entire reservoir, generating a wave 820 feet (250 meters) high that traveled over the dam and into the village below.

And it caused an impact crater 200 feet (60 meters) deep and 260 feet (80 meters) wide when it hit the ground.

A photo taken of the town Longarone before and after the mega tsunami struck shows just how devastating the event was, as the little village was completely destroyed.

However, this event was much smaller than the one that happened in Lituya Bay, Alaska in 1958.

A powerful earthquake caused a landslide at the back side of the bay, forcing land to come crashing down into the water.

A powerful Earthquake caused a landslide at the back side of the bay in Lituya Bay, Alaska in 1958., forcing land to come trashing down into the water. This event generated waves 1,722ft high, which caused damage to the area surrounding the bay and destroyed millions of trees A powerful Earthquake caused a landslide at the back side of the bay in Lituya Bay, Alaska in 1958., forcing land to come trashing down into the water. This event generated waves 1,722ft high, which caused damage to the area surrounding the bay and destroyed millions of trees

A powerful Earthquake caused a landslide at the back side of the bay in Lituya Bay, Alaska in 1958., forcing land to come trashing down into the water. This event generated waves 1,722ft high, which caused damage to the area surrounding the bay and destroyed millions of trees

The largest tsunami created by a landslide happened nearly 1.5 million years ago on the Hawaiian island called Molokai. One third of the northern portion of the volcano on the island collapsed into the ocean, which created a wave 1,969 feet (600 meters) high The largest tsunami created by a landslide happened nearly 1.5 million years ago on the Hawaiian island called Molokai. One third of the northern portion of the volcano on the island collapsed into the ocean, which created a wave 1,969 feet (600 meters) high

The largest tsunami created by a landslide happened nearly 1.5 million years ago on the Hawaiian island called Molokai. One third of the northern portion of the volcano on the island collapsed into the ocean, which created a wave 1,969 feet (600 meters) high

This event generated waves 1,722 feet (525 meters) high, which caused damage to the area surrounding the bay and destroyed millions of trees.

This wave was taller than the Empire State Building and just 52 feet (16 meters) shorter than the Freedom Tower in New York City.

But this is still tiny compared to some prehistoric mega tsunamis.

The largest tsunami created by a landslide happened nearly 1.5 million years ago on the Hawaiian island called Molokai.

One third of the northern portion of the volcano on the island collapsed into the ocean, which created a wave 1,969 feet (600 meters) high.

This waved completely flooded the island and wreaked havoc on the rest of the island chain.

‘This wave would have been about the height of four Great Pyramids of Giza stacked on top of each other,’ explains RealLifeLore.

Some 66 million years ago, an asteroid fell from space and is believed to have wiped out the dinosaurs ¿ it is also said to be the largest mega tsunami in all of Earth¿s history when it crashed into the modern day Gulf of Mexico Some 66 million years ago, an asteroid fell from space and is believed to have wiped out the dinosaurs ¿ it is also said to be the largest mega tsunami in all of Earth¿s history when it crashed into the modern day Gulf of Mexico

Some 66 million years ago, an asteroid fell from space and is believed to have wiped out the dinosaurs – it is also said to be the largest mega tsunami in all of Earth’s history when it crashed into the modern day Gulf of Mexico

‘But even this pales in comparison to the largest ever known mega tsunami, which was caused by an asteroid.’

Some 66 million years ago, an asteroid fell from space and is believed to have wiped out the dinosaurs – it is also said to be the largest mega tsunami in all of Earth’s history when it crashed into the modern day Gulf of Mexico.

The asteroid was 6 miles (10 kilometers) in diameter and when it hit, created 100 teratons of TNT worth of energy.

To put this in perspective, you would need two million Tsar Bomba, the largest nuclear bomb ever detonated, to recreate the same amount of energy.

To put this in perspective, you would need two million Tsar Bomba, the largest nuclear bomb ever detonated, to recreate the same amount of energy. It¿s believed that when the asteroid hit Earth, it generated an unbelievable wave up to 3.1 miles (5 kilometers) high To put this in perspective, you would need two million Tsar Bomba, the largest nuclear bomb ever detonated, to recreate the same amount of energy. It¿s believed that when the asteroid hit Earth, it generated an unbelievable wave up to 3.1 miles (5 kilometers) high

To put this in perspective, you would need two million Tsar Bomba, the largest nuclear bomb ever detonated, to recreate the same amount of energy. It’s believed that when the asteroid hit Earth, it generated an unbelievable wave up to 3.1 miles (5 kilometers) high

It’s believed that when the asteroid hit Earth, it generated an unbelievable wave up to 3.1 miles (5 kilometers) high.

That’s higher than the Matterhorn in the Alps by about 1,640 extra feet (500 meters).

In fact, the height is higher than all of the mountains in the entire Alpine mountain range.

Although we have no signs that suggest an event like this could happen again, RealLifeLore says there is a 0.00001 percent chance that one of the Canary Islands could collapse into the ocean during your lifetime.

This event would cause a wave so enormous, it would wipe out the entire east coast of the US. 

 

1 UFOS

The #1 UFO Resource

1 UFOS - News - Books - Videos - Feeds

1 UFOS Search Engine is Powered by the 1 Search Project



Leave a Reply